May 29, 2010

On My Wishlist #5

On My Wishlist is a fun weekly event hosted by Book Chick City and runs every Saturday. It's where you can list all the books that you desperately want but haven't actually bought yet. They can be old, new or forthcoming.

I'm going kinda random today and offering up a, well, random selection of books from my TBR list.
All book summaries came from Goodreads.



Girl in Translation by Jean Kwok
Publisher: Riverhead (c) 2010
Summary:

Introducing a fresh, exciting Chinese-American voice, an inspiring debut about an immigrant girl forced to choose between two worlds and two futures.


When Kimberly Chang and her mother emigrate from Hong Kong to Brooklyn squalor, she quickly begins a secret double life: exceptional schoolgirl during the day, Chinatown sweatshop worker in the evenings. Disguising the more difficult truths of her life-like the staggering degree of her poverty, the weight of her family's future resting on her shoulders, or her secret love for a factory boy who shares none of her talent or ambition-Kimberly learns to constantly translate not just her language but herself back and forth between the worlds she straddles.
Through Kimberly's story, author Jean Kwok, who also emigrated from Hong Kong as a young girl, brings to the page the lives of countless immigrants who are caught between the pressure to succeed in America, their duty to their family, and their own personal desires, exposing a world that we rarely hear about. Written in an indelible voice that dramatizes the tensions of an immigrant girl growing up between two cultures, surrounded by a language and world only half understood, Girl in Translation is an unforgettable and classic novel of an American immigrant-a moving tale of hardship and triumph, heartbreak and love, and all that gets lost in translation.


The Wasted Vigil by Nadeem Aslam
Publisher: Faber and Faber (c) 2004
Summary:
Marcus, an English doctor whose progressive, outspoken Afghani wife was murdered by the Taliban, opens his home—itself an eerily beautiful monument to his losses—to the others: Lara, from St. Petersburg, looking for evidence of her soldier brother who disappeared decades before during the Soviet invasion; David, an American, a former spy who has seen his ideals turned inside out during his twenty-five years in Afghanistan; Casa, a young Afghani whose hatred of the West plunges him into the depths of zealotry; and James, the Special Forces soldier in whom David sees a dangerous revival of the unquestioning notions of right and wrong that he himself once held. In mesmerizing prose, Nadeem Aslam reveals the complex ties—of love and desperation, pain and salvation, madness and clarity—that bind the characters. And through their stories he creates a timely and achingly intimate portrait of the “continuation of wars” that shapes our world.

The Green Book: The Everyday Guide to Saving the Planet One Simple Step at a Time by Elizabeth Rogers
Publisher: Three Rivers Press (c) 2007
Summary:
Ellen DeGeneres, Robert Redford, Will Ferrell, Jennifer Aniston, Faith Hill, Tim McGraw, Martha Stewart, Tyra Banks, Dale Earnhardt, Jr., Tiki Barber, Owen Wilson, and Justin Timberlake tell you how they make a difference to the environment.

Inside The Green Book, find out how you can too:

- Don’t ask for ATM receipts. If everyone in the United States refused their receipts, it would save a roll of paper more than two billion feet long, or enough to circle the equator fifteen times!
- Turn off the tap while you brush your teeth. You’ll conserve up to five gallons of water per day. Throughout the entire United States, the daily savings could add up to more water than is consumed every day in all of New York City.
- Get a voice-mail service for your home phone. If all answering machines in U.S. homes were replaced by voice-mail services, the annual energy savings would total nearly two billion kilowatt hours. The resulting reduction in air pollution would be equivalent to removing 250,000 cars from the road for a year!

With wit and authority, authors Elizabeth Rogers and Thomas Kostigen provide hundreds of solutions for all areas of your life, pinpointing the smallest changes that have the biggest impact on the health of our precious planet.


Chasing Down the Dawn by Jewel
Publisher: Harper Entertainment (c) 2000
Summary:

In Chasing Down the Dawn, recording artist, actress, and bestselling author Jewel opens her intimate journals to create a vivid montage of the people, places, and relationships that colored the life she came from and have marked this past magical, turbulent, and ultimately transformational year of her life.

Drawn from her remarkable chronicle of life on the road during the Spirit World Tour, this unforgettable collection of freeze-frames captures unusual images from jewel's childhood in Alaska, her beginnings as a struggling artist, and her challenges as a daughter, sister and woman. jewel paints an unblinkingly honest picture of the exceptional journey that carried her to the world's stage.

With acutely observed, elegantly written depictions of the musicians, lovers, strangers, celebrities and other characters that inhabit the singer/songwriter's world, Chasing Down the Dawn is more than a collection of, vignettes, observations and stories. It is a finely wrought mosaic in prose and poetry, set to the rhythm of life.

On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Publisher: Penguin Books (c) 1955
Summary:
On The Road, the most famous of Jack Kerouac's works, is not only the soul of the Beat movement and literature, but one of the most important novels of the century. Like nearly all of Kerouac's writing, On The Road is thinly fictionalized autobiography, filled with a cast made of Kerouac's real life friends, lovers, and fellow travelers. Narrated by Sal Paradise, one of Kerouac's alter-egos, On the Road is a cross-country bohemian odyssey that not only influenced writing in the years since its 1957 publication but penetrated into the deepest levels of American thought and culture.



Have you read any of these books? Which should I try to get my hands on first? Which one do you want to read?

5 comments:

  1. Girl in Translation has been on my radar lately also

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  2. I recently added Girl in Translation to my wishlist as well.

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  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  4. On the Road is one of my favorites so that one's got my vote.

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  5. Gah - On The Road is one of my LEAST favorites. So that one has my vote for being removed altogether from your list ;0)

    I thought it was sexist and never finished it. But I was a young college student at the time, empowered by independence so perhaps a re-read from a different perspective in life would do me good.

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